Time Management Diets

http://www.everythingsysadmin.com/archives/000171.html

Now I’m a reasonably slender person, many thanks to not living with a greek mother who provides snacks breakfast, brunch, lunch, dunch and dinner; helped along by this ‘vegetarianism phase’ of my life but if our physical appearance depended on how we consumed and utilised our own time, then I’d have to say that I’d be one huge behemoth creature, perhaps a jaba the hut of overbooked tasks and personal projects unrealised.

The attached blog provides 3 ‘Time Management Diets‘ in order to reduce the precious units known as seconds from falling into the vortex known as the relinquished past.

So if the TV diet, the mailing list diet, or the meeting diet sound like things you incorporate into your own life then you may as well get on board.

There is no time like the present. (Pun intended)

Java Fun and Games: Tips from the Java grab bag

http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-01-2007/jw-0102-games.html?fsrc=rss-index

I’m sure these will come in handy from time to time.

  • The simplest sound API
  • Window centering
  • Drop shadows
  • Hyperlinks and browser launching
  • Status bars
  • Image grabber (website)

Osteoporosis vs Lactose Intolerance

Well, if the dairy industry push that dairy will stop Osteoporosis especially in women as they age, I wonder how many people who suffer Lactose Intolerance go on later in life to suffer osteoporosis?

I mean if you consumed so much dairy in your lifetime to cause the gland that processes lactose to give up, then surely you’ve consumed enough dairy to stop the onslaught of ravaged bones later in life?

Alternatively, could Lactose Intolerant people be further at risk because they’ve reduced their consumption of dairy due to their condition and now lack the amount of dairy recommended by the experts?

Or is it all crap, are Lactose Intolerant and regular Joe’s all at similar risk. Is the dairy industry’s push of Osteoporosis an exaggeration? How much milk is enough?

Hey, I warn you now, this is an un-researched, completely biased question, but knowledgeable comments are appreciated.

… and could it DID!!!

Well, its been a few weeks now since I put in a 100GB 7200 RPM drive to replace the 4200RPM 40GB that Toshiba had christened this laptop with. Speed wise, it is noticeable, not as noticeable as I was expecting, but the main points are that I can hit two areas of the disk at once without experiencing the severe performance hit that I was used to on my old disk.

I say, if you are a developer, then shell out the extra for a dual core, but if you are the poor uni student like me (violin music please) then the upgrade has bought a little more life into this lappy till I return to regular full time work.

How null breaks polymorphism: or the problem with null

Eclipse Tutorials and Resources

Do you find yourself constantly checking for null

Does your clever little method now look like a small mess after you’ve incorporated your null checks? Do you find yourself asking, ‘how is anyone else going to ever follow that now’?

If so, then how is this for a neat idea? Write a language with a keyword that tells the compiler that a parameter you are passing or expecting to receive from a method cannot be null, and as a result of this checking, know that you can code the method with a lot more clarity and an immunity to null pointer exceptions.

Steve Riley’s 2 part blog on this subject poses the above scenario and some solutions even for those of us stuck in a language we cannot neuter the nulls. It’s a very enjoyable read.